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Days 4, 5 & 6: Brazil and "Disobedience" mark the kick off of the week



Until Wednesday, September 19th, it will be possible to watch the remaining three sessions of the Competition for the Best Short Film, in Room 3 of Cinema São Jorge, always at 7:15 pm. The session of Tuesday, the 18th, is attended by the Brazilian director Ana Galizia, who will present his documentary Inconfissions, a tribute to the actor and director Luiz Roberto Galizia, his uncle; of the Portuguese director Ricardo Vieira Lisboa, which presents Reinaldo's Motives, an audiovisual essay about two films by Reinaldo Ferreira; and Russian actor Vsevolod Galkin, an interpreter of It, directed by Ilya Sherstobitov, an intense fiction on transsexuality and bullying. The last session, to be held on Wednesday, is attended by the Brazilian director Carolina Markowicz, who was previously awarded at Queer Lisboa, and will present her most recent O Orphan, premiered at the last edition of the Cannes Film Festival. Also present in the session will be the Portuguese director José Magro, with his Letters from Childhood.
After having gone through the Panorama section of the last edition of the Berlinale, where it had a world premiere, the New York director Jordan Schiele will be in Lisbon to present his The Silk and the Flame, a beautiful black and white portrait of Yao, a young man Chinese, gay, who will visit family during the Chinese New Year. With a ticket on Wednesday 19th, at 9:30 p.m. in Room 3, the film is part of the Competition for Best Documentary, along with titles such as Shakedown by Leilah Weinraub (19:30, Sala Manoel de Oliveira), a dive in the electrifying homonymous parties in Los Angeles of the 1980s, and which brings together an impressive visual collection that reconstitutes this underground universe of the Afro-American and lesbian community; or Letters to a Book Thief, by Caio Cavechini and Carlos Juliano Barros - who won the public's award last year at Queer Lisboa, with Entre de Men de Bem -, where we accompanied the life of Laessio, a marginal figure who made the theft of works of art to your life. The film has a second screening on Monday, 17, at 5:15 pm, in the Manoel de Oliveira Room.
Integrated in the Queer Art Competition, Queer Lisboa 22 receives the Brazilian director Jean Santos, for the presentation of Superpina (Monday, 17th, at 9:30 p.m., in Room 3, with a second screening on Tuesday, 18th, at 5:15 p.m. , in the Manoel de Oliveira Room - in the image), a free and daring film about the search for "primordial love", with scenery in the neighborhood of Pina, in Recife. On Tuesday, the 18th, at 9:30 p.m. in Room 3, and also integrated in Queer Art, it is the turn of the festival to receive the Spanish director Mònica Rovira, to tell us about her Ver a una Mujer, a delicate and intimate portrait where Rovira revisits his relationship with ex-girlfriend, Sarai.
The migratory movements and what they entail in terms of identity, the different looks between the West and the East, different concepts of what it is to be-seer, feed and find place of reflection in much of the cinema of recent years. This edition of Queer Lisboa brings together a set of these titles, which allow a reflection on these themes. Among these titles is Martyr, by Mazen Khaled (Monday, 17:30, Sala Manoel de Oliveira), part of the Queer Art Competition, a very original homoerotic allegory on the subject of death, shot in the city of Beirut. This feature film is preceded by the exhibition of Sewing Borders by Mohamad Hafeda, an imaginative approach by some residents of Beirut to notions of space, time, and historical boundaries. The presentation of Apricot Groves, Armenian film by Pouria Heidary Oureh (Monday, 17, 17h00, Room 3), will be followed by a debate following the session with Turkish programmer Esra Özban, where topics will be discussed related to migration issues.
On Wednesday, the 19th at 10pm, in the Manoel de Oliveira Room, the lesbian fiction, Disobedience, by Sebastián Lelio (from A Fantastic Woman) and starring Rachel Weisz, Rachel McAdams and Alessandro Nivola takes place. Living in New York where she works as a photographer, Ronit (Weisz) knows of the death of her father, an Orthodox Jew, and decides to return home in London for funeral ceremonies. Long estranged from the family, Ronit must learn to deal with the Jewish Orthodox community again. There she is welcomed by her childhood friend, Dovid (Nivola), a protege of the father who educated him to his successor. But his big surprise is when he learns that Dovid married his best friend, Esti (McAdams).

 

Until Wednesday, September 19th, it's possible to watch the remaining three sessions of the Competition for the Best Short Film, in Room 3 of Cinema São Jorge, always at 7:15pm. The session of Tuesday, the 18th, is attended by the Brazilian director Ana Galizia, who will present her documentary Unconfessions, a tribute to the actor and director Luiz Roberto Galizia, her uncle; of the Portuguese director Ricardo Vieira Lisboa, which presents Reinaldo's Motifs, an audiovisual essay about two films by Reinaldo Ferreira; and Russian actor Vsevolod Galkin, an interpreter of It, directed by Ilya Sherstobitov, an intense fiction on transsexuality and bullying. The last session, to be held on Wednesday, is attended by the Brazilian director Carolina Markowicz, who was previously awarded at Queer Lisboa, and will present her most recent The Orphan, premiered at the last edition of the Cannes Film Festival. Also present in the session will be the Portuguese director José Magro, with his Letters from Childhood.

After having gone through the Panorama section of the last edition of the Berlinale, where it had a world premiere, the New York director Jordan Schiele will be in Lisbon to present his The Silk and the Flame, a beautiful black and white portrait of Yao, a young man Chinese, gay, who will visit family during the Chinese New Year. The film will be screened on Wednesday 19th, at 9:30pm in Room 3 and it's part of the Competition for Best Documentary, along with titles such as Shakedown by Leilah Weinraub (7:30pm, Manoel de Oliveira Room), a dive in the electrifying homonymous parties in Los Angeles of the 1980's, and which brings together an impressive visual collection that reconstitutes this underground universe of the Afro-American and lesbian community; or Letters to a Book Thief, by Caio Cavechini and Carlos Juliano Barros - who won the public's award last year at Queer Lisboa, with Entre de Men de Bem -, where we accompanied the life of Láessio, a marginal figure who made the theft of works of art his living. The film has a second screening on Monday, 17, at 5:15 pm, in the Manoel de Oliveira Room.

Integrated in the Queer Art Competition, Queer Lisboa 22 receives the Brazilian director Jean Santos, for the presentation of Superpina (Monday, 17th, at 9:30 pm, in Room 3, with a second screening on Tuesday, 18th, at 5:15 pm, in the Manoel de Oliveira Room - in the image), a free and daring film about the search for "primordial love", with scenery in the neighborhood of Pina, in Recife. On Tuesday, the 18th, at 9:30 pm in Room 3, and also integrated in Queer Art, the festival will receive the Spanish director Mònica Rovira, to tell us about her Ver a una Mujer, a delicate and intimate portrait where Rovira revisits her relationship with her ex-girlfriend, Sarai.

The migratory movements and what they entail in terms of identity, the different looks between the West and the East, different concepts of what it is to be queer, feed and find place of reflection in much of the cinema of recent years. This edition of Queer Lisboa brings together a set of these titles, which allow a reflection on these themes. Among these titles is Martyr, by Mazen Khaled (Monday, 5:30 pm, Sala Manoel de Oliveira), part of the Queer Art Competition, a very original homoerotic allegory on the subject of death, shot in the city of Beirut. This feature film is preceded by the exhibition of Sewing Borders by Mohamad Hafeda, an imaginative approach by some residents of Beirut to notions of space, time, and historical boundaries. The presentation of Apricot Groves, Armenian film by Pouria Heidary Oureh (Monday, 17, 5 pm, Room 3), will be followed by a debate following the session with Turkish programmer Esra Özban, where topics will be discussed related to migration issues.

On Wednesday the 19th takes place, at 10 pm, in the Manoel de Oliveira Room, the lesbian fiction, Disobedience, by Sebastián Lelio (from A Fantastic Woman) and starring Rachel Weisz, Rachel McAdams and Alessandro Nivola. Living in New York where she works as a photographer, Ronit (Weisz) knows of the death of her father, an Orthodox Jew, and decides to return home in London for funeral ceremonies. Long estranged from the family, Ronit must learn to deal with the Jewish Orthodox community again. There she is welcomed by his childhood friend, Dovid (Nivola), a protege of her father who educated him to his successor. But her big surprise is when she learns that Dovid married her best friend, Esti (McAdams).

At the start of the week, the cycle "The virus-cinema: cinema queer and HIV/AIDS" continues at the Cinemateca Portuguesa, with the screening of the documentary by Joaquim Pinto, What now? Remind me (Monday, 17th, 9.30 pm, M. Félix Ribeiro Room), and the session Shorts 1: Bordowitz & others (Tuesday, 18, 7 pm, M. Félix Ribeiro Room), which presents us with a set of films linked to the 1980's and early 1990's video-activism of filmmakers such as Gregg Bordowitz, the Gran Fury or John Greyson. On Wednesday, the 19th, at 6:30 pm, in the Luís de Pina Room, there will be a session dedicated to the films of Mike Hoolboom and Matthias Müller, followed by a Debate around this program with the presence of the French essayist Didier Roth- Bettoni, author of the book Les années sida à l'écran, Maria José Campos, a physician, and João Pedro Vale, a visual artist.